Recognizing Family Caregivers: Handling Stress and Finding Resources

November is National Family Caregivers Month and we wanted to take time to recognize all family caregivers. Last year, we were celebrating them, too. 

Caregiver Action Network announced the theme “Caregiving around the clock” and has some good tips and resources. While the stress of caregiving can often be overwhelming, we wanted to learn about how other caregivers ask for more help or delegate.

We asked former and current caregivers if they asked for help and how they looked for resources. Of those that we asked, most reported that they asked for some kind of help or searched for resources online to mixed success. As Working Daughter discussed, not all of us are good at asking for help. 

The most common obstacles to asking for what we need are thinking:
I don’t need help.
I should do this.
I don’t want to bother anyone.
Asking for help makes me look weak/lazy/incapable/selfish….
It won’t be done right.
— Working Daughter

Looking back on our personal experience, it was an acute and rapidly changing process in caring for our sister. Her symptoms changed and increased dramatically and our stress levels were extremely high. It was physically and emotionally taxing and we often felt to be in a fog and we weren’t sure how to ask for help. It sometimes felt like another thing “To do”- reach out to others for assistance with meals, the children, coordinating rides while we were traveling to help our sister. We wanted people to read our mind but we know now that is not possible!

ToDo.jpeg

Our younger sister, Caitlin (#4 in the birth order) helped care for our sister with end stage cancer. She was 27 when our sister died. She stated, “ I tended to look for resources myself rather than asking for help, partly because as a young caregiver for a young person, not many people I knew had been in a similar situation.” Caitlin was among the estimated 19 million young adult caregivers as of 2015, an under-served population.  But if no one can relate to your experience, Caitlin has some great ideas about where to find resources, advice, and tips. “ I researched online, both through sources like the NIH for mainstream questions on how to manage a certain symptom, and through articles and blogs for things like easy, healthy, make-ahead recipes. One advantage to reading message boards and blog comments is finding tips from someone dealing with a similar illness that apply more specifically to your caregiving issue than a general article would. Also, YouTube videos were perfect for learning exercises, stretches, and massages to deal with aches and pains. Yelp and other review sites were essential for crowdsourcing local resources--massage therapist recommendations, or take-out dinner ideas when we were too overwhelmed to cook.”

Similarly, Feylyn Lewis, a doctoral researcher focusing on young caregivers, responded: “As a youth caregiver, I did ask and search for resources on young caregiving, hoping to find stories of young people who cared for their parents like me. To my dismay, I didn't find anything, nor were health professionals aware of resources either.” So, Feylyn took it upon herself to do searches online and ask her therapist at the time. She notes that there is an increasing presence of online support groups on social media for young caregivers and the isolation she felt has inspired her to help change this for young caregivers today.

Kristen Farrar is a caregiver for her child with Type One Diabetes. She said, “Having a child diagnosed with Type One Diabetes is similar to having your first child. You don't really know what you're doing at first and there is a lot of learning as you go.” She also explained that while the most overwhelming part was right after diagnosis, there are frequent times when she still feels overwhelmed. Kristen immediately reached out to a co-worker who also had a child with Type One Diabetes and became involved with the non-profit JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation).

Mary Lou who cares for her husband said that she tried searching online for meal ideas when she felt truly overwhelmed trying to figure out what to feed her husband between conflicting medical diets, little appetite, and doctor’s orders to use low sodium. She also asked the doctor for a referral to a nutritionist and is waiting to hear back. We can personally relate to the challenges of dietary restrictions and good nutrition while caregiving!

The Family Caregiver Alliance reminded us that there are many resources listed here on their website with statistics, reports, and tips about caregiving. They also have stories from caregivers about their personal experiences here.

A common theme that we heard in talking with other caregivers is to find others to commiserate with, to decompress, to confide in. Kristen said, “When I do, I vent to my husband or reach out to an amazing group of local women who have Type One children. We have a group text where we vent to each other. Each fall we do a charity walk for JDRF. We also try and get together for breakfast or dinner once a month. I'm on some Facebook pages that I read sometimes. It helps to read about others who are going through similar things as my family.” Caitlin said “I learned that it really helps to have others to rely on, and I was lucky to have our whole family involved in caregiving. For any caregivers working on their own, I think finding friends or community members to vent to and bounce questions/ideas off of is essential to staying sane and energized.”

Speaking of relating to others going through something similar….we just discovered this Podcast which features stories by family caregivers, The Happy Healthy Caregiver.  We also recently learned about a program through the University of Denver,  Center for Oncology Psychology Excellence (COPE), offering psychological and emotional support to cancer patients and their families.  COPE is the first psychology program of its kind in the nation to provide comprehensive training and partnership with cancer center. They stated, “Caregiving takes an emotional and physical toll on the body. It is a lot of work! Everyone is always saying you need to talk care of yourself before you take care of the person you are caring for, and that is really hard to hear, but it is so true! Taking self-care time to go for a walk, or do something focused on the caregiver is important to stay healthy.” They offer several great resources in the Denver area and online, many of which can be found on their website here.

Caregiving is hard. It is also very rewarding. As Caitlin said: 

I was also surprised to learn how difficult but still rewarding the experience can be. It was extremely hard for our sister to need us to take care of her, and it was exhausting for everyone, but I am so glad we we could be there for her.
— Caitlin

There are many ways to learn and grow from caregiving experiences. Kristen says she would be more honest in order to decrease her stress, saying “I try to minimize or downplay with family and friends how hard it really can be to manage Type One. So if there is one thing I'd do differently it would be to be more open and honest about how stressed or frustrated I can feel at times.” Caitlin says “I would have taken more time off work--which is a luxurious choice most people don't have. It was hard to predict how our sister would do week to week, and while I missed the familiarity of my routine, I wish I hadn't put pressure on myself to keep up with work and  take on added stress.” Mary Lou says “Patience!  Slow down and do one thing at a time.  Lower my standards and don't worry about it. More Patience!” She adds: “Sometimes the most important thing I could do for Jim or my Mom, was to just hold them, and love them.” Feylyn says, “I try to stay mindful in the moment and not live so ‘future-focused’! This helps my worry immensely.” Looking back, we agree that we would be more honest about our overwhelming feelings, worry less about the insignificant things, and do our best to stay present.

We enjoyed gathering all of the insight that these caregivers, professionals, and experts have shared and hope it helps you too.

 

Nov. 10, 2016 Caregiving and Grief News Roundup

November is National Family Caregivers Month! There is even an official proclamation from President Obama. We are reminded of our prior post, A Caregivers "To Don't" List, and hope you are finding time to relax. Let us know how you are celebrating or if you are thinking of a special caregiver this month. We are always celebrating siblings! Other great organizations are also recognizing this special month, such as WorkingDaughter.com and National Alliance for Caregiving.

This new business “Wellthy” is brilliant and just received $2 million in seed funding. Families are actually assigned a coordinator who helps with various overwhelming tasks such as dealing with insurance claims, refilling prescriptions, and arranging specialist appointments. We love what Lindsay Jurist-Rosner, founder of Wellthy, says at the end of this article: “Starting a business is hard work,” she says. “But after the experience my family and I have had, starting a company is nothing.”

This article offers an interesting perspective and plenty of facts and links to information about caregiving costs and need for more support.

Read about the honest conversation featured on a Cosmopolitan.com podcast that includes one of our favorite authors, Nora McInerny Pumort (“It’s Ok to Laugh (Crying Is Cool Too)”), and the CEO of a helpful website featuring stories of loss, Rebecca Soffer (ModernLoss.com), who discuss loss and how to help yourself or a friend.

As we’ve already said, we love Emily McDowell’s greeting cards and appreciate her humor and sincerity. And it is perfect that she has written a book - "There is No Good Card for This: What to Say and Do When Life Is Scary, Awful, and Unfair to People You Love" - with empathy expert, Dr. Krowe. We can’t wait for this book to be available in January, but for now we wanted you to get as excited as we are about it.

The Guardian shares insights from readers about what death and grief means to them.

This article describes a recent stand-up set by comedian Patton Oswalt, who opened up about his grief over the sudden death of his wife with humor and honesty.